Présentation

Ecuador - Born in 1966
The Hymn of the Andes

Now accustomed to seeing his pictures published in prestigious American magazine National Geographic, Pablo Corral Vega, a master of colour photography, has never lost sight of the mission he set himself upon entering the profession: “I’ve always wanted to bear witness to the world in all its diversity and beauty. What fits naturally with me is relating culture and daily life, human beings in their simplest and noblest condition.” As a young boy growing up in the Andes, he would go fishing, sometimes with his father and always with his camera. And years later, the Ecuadorian photographer set off to rediscover the Andean Cordillera, which soars skywards over 8,500 kilometres of highlands. Thus, from Patagonia to the Caribbean, the jagged spine of South America connects countries and cultures. Written by Literary Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa, the captions accompanying the photographs in the exhibition are not factual descriptions. They are works of fiction, created by a mind inspired by the arresting images he has seen: “These photographs show people weighed down by centuries of oppression, people who have been exploited then forgotten, people condemned to live in appalling conditions with a constant awareness of death. And yet, despite it all, nothing has dampened their zest for life.”
Pablo Corral Vega_FestivalPhotoLaGacilly2020
Pablo Corral Vega_FestivalPhotoLaGacilly2020

Exposition

Pablo Corral Vega_FestivalPhotoLaGacilly2020
Viva Latina ! Ecuador - Born in 1966

Now accustomed to seeing his pictures published in prestigious American magazine National Geographic, Pablo Corral Vega, a master of colour photography, has never lost sight of the mission he set himself upon entering the profession: “I’ve always wanted to bear witness to the world in all its diversity and beauty. What fits naturally with me is relating culture and daily life, human beings in their simplest and noblest condition.” As a young boy growing up in the Andes, he would go fishing, sometimes with his father and always with his camera. And years later, the Ecuadorian photographer set off to rediscover the Andean Cordillera, which soars skywards over 8,500 kilometres of highlands. Thus, from Patagonia to the Caribbean, the jagged spine of South America connects countries and cultures. Written by Literary Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa, the captions accompanying the photographs in the exhibition are not factual descriptions. They are works of fiction, created by a mind inspired by the arresting images he has seen: “These photographs show people weighed down by centuries of oppression, people who have been exploited then forgotten, people condemned to live in appalling conditions with a constant awareness of death. And yet, despite it all, nothing has dampened their zest for life.”